New biodiversity hotspots questioned

Sep 07, 2005

Five years ago, conservationists identified 25 worldwide sites where plant and animal species are most abundant -- but now there reportedly are six more.

Since life on Earth isn't evenly spread, conservationists decided to create a list of so-called hotspots -- areas where species diversity is greater than normal, the Independent reported Wednesday.

The theory was if conservation efforts were focused on such areas, the rate of species extinctions might be slowed or stopped, the newspaper said.

But the first detailed global map of the world's bird species indicates areas in which most avian species can be found do not always overlap with areas in which they are most threatened, the Independent reported.

Professor Ian Owens of Imperial College London, who led the study published last month in the journal Nature, says the world's bird "hotspots" are in the mountains of South America and Africa. But in terms of extinction risk, they are in Madagascar, New Zealand and the Philippines.

"Different types of diversity don't map in the same way," Owens said. "A variety of mechanisms are therefore responsible biodiversity, and this points to the need to base conservation on more than one measure."

Copyright 2005 by United Press International

Explore further: Migrant employment on the rise

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Capturing beautiful millipedes in Ohio

Aug 05, 2014

I stumbled through the forest, attempting to find a path I knew was there. It didn't take that long to find the decaying bridge, now being overtaken by blackberry and multiflora rose. That is where I had ...

Zoologists discover bird species in Indonesia

Jun 06, 2014

(Phys.org) —Zoologists from Trinity College Dublin have discovered a currently unrecognised bird species in a biodiversity hotspot in Indonesia. They propose that the colourful bird, which is found only on one small chain ...

Young plant rescuer on a mission

Jun 27, 2014

There are only 400 Stirling Range Wattles and 600 Kambellup Banksias alive in the wild - and a researcher at The University of Western Australia has devoted the last four years of her life to making sure ...

Recommended for you

Migrant employment on the rise

28 minutes ago

Skilled migrants are enjoying better jobs and higher levels of employment thanks to a shift in policy, according to a new study by the Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research at the University ...

US company sells out of Ebola toys

Oct 17, 2014

They might look tasteless, but satisfied customers dub them cute and adorable. Ebola-themed toys have proved such a hit that one US-based company has sold out.

New progress of the Neogene Suidae research

Oct 17, 2014

Dr. Hou Sukuan and Prof. Deng Tao from the Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology(IVPP), Chinese Academy of Sciences reported a new species of Chleuastochoerus from the Linxia Basin, Gansu ...

User comments : 0