Fujitsu's 200GB Serial ATA Hard Disk Drive for Notebooks

Mar 28, 2006
Hard Drive

Fujitsu today announced the MHV2200BT, a 200GB 2.5" Serial ATA (SATA) hard disk drive, as part of a coordinated global launch.

Fujitsu developed the MHV2200BT to address growing demands for mobile hard disk drives with the performance and capacity required for external HDD products as well as high-end audio/video computing applications such as gaming, video editing, audio recording and DVR functionality. The world’s first 200GB capacity mobile hard disk drive, the product will begin shipping in 3CQ06.

Within the rapidly expanding IT and consumer electronics industries, the need for hard disk drives featuring increasingly higher capacities continues to boom. Major original equipment manufacturers are already shipping products featuring the 160GB 2.5" SATA hard disk drive that Fujitsu launched in August 2005.

The latest offering from Fujitsu builds on nearly five years of SATA development on the 2.5" platform to provide best-in-class low power consumption, unmatched capacity at 200GB, high shock tolerance, and quiet operation. These features come together to allow manufactures to create high-end notebooks that rival the power and performance of their desktop counterparts. The MHV2200BT also features a hardware accelerator that maximizes Native Command Queuing performance, an important feature that enables the hard disk drive controller to intelligently and simultaneously queue and reorder up to 32 instructions, resulting in a significant improvement in overall hard disk drive performance.

"Fujitsu has focused heavily on R&D to establish itself as the leader in the 2.5" SATA hard disk drive space," said Joel Hagberg, vice president, marketing and business development, Fujitsu Computer Products of America. "We delivered the industry’s first 2.5" SATA hard disk drive in January 2004, the 160GB 2.5" offering slightly less than a year ago and now, with the MHV2200BT, we have again illustrated that we are committed to being a leader in this market."

Source: Fujitsu

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