Human tissue to be made from stem cells

Sep 06, 2005

University of Liverpool researchers reportedly are striving to make human tissue grown from stem cells available for transplant within four years.

The $31 million project funded by the European Commission is designed eventually to cure such illnesses as heart failure, diabetes, chronic ulcers and degenerative diseases, The London Mirror reported Tuesday. Scientists believe stem cells can generate healthy tissue to replace that damaged by disease or injury.

Professor David Williams of Britain's Center for Tissue Engineering at Liverpool University told the Mirror: "The science is nearly there, but we have to find a reliable way of doing it."

Copyright 2005 by United Press International

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