2001 article predicted New Orleans flood

Sep 01, 2005

A 2001 story in the magazine Scientific American predicted the flooding that New Orleans suffered from Hurricane Katrina.

The October 2001 article titled "Drowning New Orleans" detailed reasons the area is vulnerable to major storms and flooding and problems with mass evacuations. It recommended steps to protect the area.

The construction of levees and other industrial developments in former marshlands between the city and the Gulf of Mexico has deteriorated a buffer that would slow rising waters and incoming storms. The article called for massive reengineering of the area to save the city.

Engineers called for the similar changes Thursday.

More than 30,000 U.S. servicemen and women are on the Gulf Coast assisting evacuation, rescue and security operations.

Katrina devastated much in its path Monday but New Orleans especially was hard hit when levees gave way.

President Bush has called it the worst natural disaster ever in the United States.

Copyright 2005 by United Press International

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