To the Moon, Mars and beyond: NASA's new Propulsion Research Laboratory starts the journey

Jul 31, 2004
To the Moon, Mars and beyond: NASA's new Propulsion Research Laboratory starts the journey

NASA's new Propulsion Research Laboratory gives scientists and engineers a secure, safely isolated, yet still accessible environment to start tomorrow's fantastic journeys.

The July 29 official opening ceremonies marked full operation of the laboratory at the Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala.

The 66,000-square-foot facility has 26 labs, including high-bay areas and heavy-duty cranes.

Solar energy, advanced chemical propulsion, high power plasma propulsion, fission, fusion and anti-matter technologies are technologies already under evaluation for space travel.

The laboratory, home of the Marshall Center's Propulsion Research Center, provides a national resource for researchers from NASA, other government agencies and universities to conduct short-term and long-term experiments.

Talk to an expert about the lab's opening and the future of space propulsion.

Source: NASA

Explore further: A new instrument to study the extreme universe—the X-Ray polarimeter X-Calibur

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

A first peek beneath the surface of a comet

Jan 22, 2015

In some of the first research findings to be published from the European Space Agency's Rosetta Mission to the comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, scientists including astronomer Peter Schloerb of the University ...

Rosetta data give closest-ever look at a comet

Jan 22, 2015

On Nov. 12, 2014, the European Space Agency's Rosetta mission made history when its Philae lander touched down on the surface of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. While this exciting technical achievement ...

Asteroid to fly by Earth safely on January 26

Jan 14, 2015

An asteroid, designated 2004 BL86, will safely pass about three times the distance of Earth to the moon on January 26. From its reflected brightness, astronomers estimate that the asteroid is about a third ...

Chinese H-bomb physicist gets top award

Jan 09, 2015

A Chinese nuclear physicist whose research was key to the country's development of the hydrogen bomb and whose identity was a state secret for decades was awarded its top science prize Friday, state media reported.

Recommended for you

Image: A Hubble sweep of the dust filaments of NGC 4217

29 minutes ago

In this image the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope takes a close look at the spiral galaxy NGC 4217, located 60 million light-years away from Earth. The galaxy is seen almost perfectly edge on and is a perfect ...

VLT image: The mouth of the beast

5 hours ago

Like the gaping mouth of a gigantic celestial creature, the cometary globule CG4 glows menacingly in this new image from ESO's Very Large Telescope. Although it appears to be big and bright in this picture, ...

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.