Math institute gets largest NSF grant ever

Jul 20, 2005

The Institute for Mathematics and its Applications in Minnesota has received the largest math research grant ever made by the National Science Foundation.

The $19.5-million, five-year grant was awarded Wednesday, and firmly establishes the institute as the top math institute in the nation, University of Minnesota President Robert Bruininks told the Minneapolis Star Tribune.

The institute brings together mathematicians, biologists, engineers, psychologists and other scientists and technicians to give practical application to abstract disciplines.

Researchers associated with the institute have, among other things, developed an undetectable system to spot enemy aircraft and a math-based system to diagnose serious heart problems,

"Mathematicians used to work alone and do very esoteric work and no one understood what they were doing," Institute Director Douglas Arnold told the Star Tribune. "Very few places run meetings of biologists and engineers and mathematicians and computer scientists. We're the gardeners, and we plant the seed."

Copyright 2005 by United Press International

Explore further: Teachers' scare tactics may lead to lower exam scores

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Stopping the brain drain of women scientists

Feb 06, 2014

You can be forgiven for assuming that gender is not an issue any more in higher education. There are more young women entering universities than ever before and they are graduating each year in their hundreds of thousands. But ...

How math helps stop oil spills and plane crashes

Dec 20, 2013

Jason Merrick, Ph.D., says that his daughters tell people that their father stops oil spills, plane crashes and terrorist attacks with math. That's one way to describe Merrick's research, which at its core involves developing ...

Recommended for you

Teachers' scare tactics may lead to lower exam scores

1 hour ago

As the school year winds down and final exams loom, teachers may want to avoid reminding students of the bad consequences of failing a test because doing so could lead to lower scores, according to new research published ...

Hyperbolic homogeneous polynomials, oh my!

2 hours ago

Cutting-edge mathematics today, at least to the uninitiated, often sounds as if it bears no relation to the arithmetic we all learned in grade school. What do topology and combinatorics and n-dimensional ...

Poll: Big Bang a big question for most Americans

8 hours ago

Few Americans question that smoking causes cancer. But they have more skepticism than confidence in global warming, the age of the Earth and evolution and have the most trouble believing a Big Bang created the universe 13.8 ...

User comments : 0

More news stories

Hyperbolic homogeneous polynomials, oh my!

Cutting-edge mathematics today, at least to the uninitiated, often sounds as if it bears no relation to the arithmetic we all learned in grade school. What do topology and combinatorics and n-dimensional ...

Teachers' scare tactics may lead to lower exam scores

As the school year winds down and final exams loom, teachers may want to avoid reminding students of the bad consequences of failing a test because doing so could lead to lower scores, according to new research published ...

Poll: Big Bang a big question for most Americans

Few Americans question that smoking causes cancer. But they have more skepticism than confidence in global warming, the age of the Earth and evolution and have the most trouble believing a Big Bang created the universe 13.8 ...