Bruker AXS Wins Prestigious R&D 100 Award For Innovative X-ray Detector

Jul 18, 2005

Bruker AXS Inc., a leading global provider of advanced X-ray solutions for life and advanced materials sciences, announced today that R&D Magazine has selected its VANTEC-2000 detector for a 2005 R&D 100 Award, which recognizes the most technologically significant products introduced into the marketplace during the past year.

“Since its introduction, the VANTEC-2000 has dramatically boosted the performance of X-ray diffraction (XRD) detectors for materials research. It combines low noise, high sensitivity, excellent spatial resolution and dynamic range with real-time data acquisition. This even allows for snapshot and movie mode acquisition in a virtually maintenance-free detector, that is unrivalled in the XRD marketplace,” stated Uwe Preckwinkel, the Bruker AXS U.S. XRD Product Manager.

Unlike older XRD detector technologies, the VANTEC-2000 measures the two-dimensional X-ray diffraction pattern from a sample. The result allows for the calculation of a wide variety of physical parameters in a broad range of sample types. Because of its unique capability to detect individual photons at up to 2 million counts per second, the detector is ideal for the analysis of weakly and/or strongly scattering samples - including smallest sample traces, single crystals, epitaxial thin films, coatings, rocks, polymers, metals, steel, wood, plastics, liquids, nanomaterials and more.

The award, selected by an independent panel of judges and the editors of R&D Magazine, “provides a mark of excellence known to industry, government, and academia as proof that the product is one of the most innovative ideas of the year,” explained the magazine’s Editor-in-Chief, Tim Studt.

For more information, please visit www.bruker-axs.com

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