Moderation in cell phone use is urged

Jul 12, 2005
Woman Cell Phone

A Canadian public health official is urging people to moderate their use of cell phones until uncertainties about long-term health effects are resolved.

Canadian Chief Public Health Officer Dr. David Butler-Jones made the remark Monday at a three-day World Health Organization conference in Toronto.

Butler-Jones told more than 100 academics, public health officials and scientists from around the world that constantly changing technology has created a moving target, leaving scientists playing a game of catchup, the Toronto Star reported.

"Our technology has passed our ability to understand what biological effects are positive or negative," said Butler-Jones, who heads the new Public Health Agency of Canada.

"What would be the message? The message would be that moderation is a good thing," he said during an interview with the newspaper after his presentation. "Talking for two hours every night on cell phones, would I advise that? No."

Butler-Jones said use of cell phones during one's childhood might also have an impact on obesity and the way children interact socially with family and friends.

Copyright 2005 by United Press International

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