Moderation in cell phone use is urged

Jul 12, 2005
Woman Cell Phone

A Canadian public health official is urging people to moderate their use of cell phones until uncertainties about long-term health effects are resolved.

Canadian Chief Public Health Officer Dr. David Butler-Jones made the remark Monday at a three-day World Health Organization conference in Toronto.

Butler-Jones told more than 100 academics, public health officials and scientists from around the world that constantly changing technology has created a moving target, leaving scientists playing a game of catchup, the Toronto Star reported.

"Our technology has passed our ability to understand what biological effects are positive or negative," said Butler-Jones, who heads the new Public Health Agency of Canada.

"What would be the message? The message would be that moderation is a good thing," he said during an interview with the newspaper after his presentation. "Talking for two hours every night on cell phones, would I advise that? No."

Butler-Jones said use of cell phones during one's childhood might also have an impact on obesity and the way children interact socially with family and friends.

Copyright 2005 by United Press International

Explore further: Accident prevention should look at the big picture of what went wrong

Related Stories

Applications of optical fibre for sensors

Mar 26, 2015

Mikel Bravo-Acha's PhD thesis has focused on the applications of optical fibre as a sensor. In the course of his research, conducted at the NUP/UPNA-Public University of Navarre, he monitored a sensor fitted to optical fibre ...

Building a better course starts with the syllabus

Mar 17, 2015

Recent award-winning research from the University of Virginia's Teaching Resource Center shows that tailoring teaching to how students learn improves courses and creates long-lasting impact.

Recommended for you

Using Twitter to probe political polarization

3 hours ago

We'd like to believe that our opinions are nuanced, balanced, high-minded, wise and above all, unique, but alas they are not—or so says Twitter. Most often, those we engage with on the popular social media ...

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.