Scientists study music hallucinations

Jul 12, 2005

Psychiatrists at St. Cadoc's Hospital in Wales have issued the largest case-series study ever published concerning musical hallucinations.

Although the condition has been known for more than a century, it has rarely been studied, The New York Times reported Tuesday. It is believed musical hallucinations result from malfunctioning brain networks.

Dr. Victor Aziz and Dr. Nick Warner analyzed 30 cases of musical hallucination covering 15 years and found in two-thirds of the cases musical hallucinations were the only mental disturbance experienced by the patients.

Women tended to suffer musical hallucinations more than men, and the average patient was 78 years old. Religious music was heard in two-thirds of the cases.

The researchers noted musical hallucinations differ from the auditory hallucinations of people with schizophrenia in that only music is heard.

There is no treatment, with some doctors trying antipsychotic drugs, with others using cognitive behavioral therapy.

Aziz told the Times he suspects musical hallucinations will become more commonplace since people today are awash in music from radios, televisions, elevators and supermarkets. "I hope I live long enough to find out myself in 20 years time," he said.

The study appears in the July issue of the journal Psychopathology.

Copyright 2005 by United Press International

Explore further: A two generation lens: Current state policies fail to support families with young children

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Environmentalists and industry duke it out over plastic bags

48 minutes ago

Campaigns against disposable plastic shopping bags and their environmental impact recently scored a major win. In August, California lawmakers passed the first statewide ban on the bags, and Governor Jerry Brown is expected ...

NASA sees Tropical Storm Kalmaegi weakening over Vietnam

51 minutes ago

Tropical Storm Kalmaegi made landfall on September 17 near the border of Vietnam and China and moved inland. Soon after the landfall as a typhoon, NASA's Terra satellite passed overhead and captured an image ...

Recommended for you

New hadrosaur noses into spotlight

Sep 19, 2014

Call it the Jimmy Durante of dinosaurs – a newly discovered hadrosaur with a truly distinctive nasal profile. The new dinosaur, named Rhinorex condrupus by paleontologists from North Carolina State Univer ...

Scholar tracks the changing world of gay sexuality

Sep 19, 2014

With same-sex marriage now legalized in 19 states and laws making it impossible to ban homosexuals from serving in the military, gay, lesbian and bisexual people are now enjoying more freedoms and rights than ever before.

User comments : 0