Zinc-Air Batteries Will Extend Mission Times Of NASA Micro Aerial Vehicles

Jun 27, 2005

Arotech says its Electric Fuel subsidiary has successfully demonstrated its 4th generation zinc air technology in a NASA concept Micro Aerial Vehicle (MAV).
The novel zinc-air batteries delivered 33% more energy than the state of the art high performance lithium batteries.

The zinc-air battery prototype was developed for NASA under a contract received earlier this year, to achieve extended flight times for NASA's unmanned aerial vehicles.

"The achievement of longer mission times is critical for our unmanned aerial vehicle programs," said Mike Logan, head of the Small Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Laboratory at NASA's Langley Research Center.

"We tested this battery and it successfully powered the engine in our mini UAV for 58 minutes."

Arotech's Electric Fuel has received numerous development contracts for its 4th generation zinc-air batteries for MAVs and other applications. The Company has already demonstrated on several occasions that its zinc air batteries extend the mission duration of small unmanned aircraft.

"Our high-power, lightweight zinc-air fuel cell is proving to be a most beneficial solution for the rapidly growing micro unmanned vehicle market," said Robert S. Ehrlich, Arotech Chairman and CEO.

"This recent demonstration, together with other recently announced contracts for our new zinc air cells, places us at the forefront of this technology and establishes our leadership in this field.

Copyright 2005 by Space Daily, Distributed by United Press International

Explore further: Honda's new ASIMO robot, more human-like than ever

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Recommended for you

Simplicity is key to co-operative robots

7 hours ago

A way of making hundreds—or even thousands—of tiny robots cluster to carry out tasks without using any memory or processing power has been developed by engineers at the University of Sheffield, UK.

Freight train industry to miss safety deadline

8 hours ago

The U.S. freight railroad industry says only one-fifth of its track will be equipped with mandatory safety technology to prevent most collisions and derailments by the deadline set by Congress.

IBM posts lower 1Q earnings amid hardware slump

9 hours ago

IBM's first-quarter earnings fell and revenue came in below Wall Street's expectations amid an ongoing decline in its hardware business, one that was exasperated by weaker demand in China and emerging markets.

User comments : 0

More news stories

Simplicity is key to co-operative robots

A way of making hundreds—or even thousands—of tiny robots cluster to carry out tasks without using any memory or processing power has been developed by engineers at the University of Sheffield, UK.

Microsoft CEO is driving data-culture mindset

(Phys.org) —Microsoft's future strategy: is all about leveraging data, from different sources, coming together using one cohesive Microsoft architecture. Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella on Tuesday, both in ...

Floating nuclear plants could ride out tsunamis

When an earthquake and tsunami struck the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant complex in 2011, neither the quake nor the inundation caused the ensuing contamination. Rather, it was the aftereffects—specifically, ...

Patent talk: Google sharpens contact lens vision

(Phys.org) —A report from Patent Bolt brings us one step closer to what Google may have in mind in developing smart contact lenses. According to the discussion Google is interested in the concept of contact ...

Quantenna promises 10-gigabit Wi-Fi by next year

(Phys.org) —Quantenna Communications has announced that it has plans for releasing a chipset that will be capable of delivering 10Gbps WiFi to/from routers, bridges and computers by sometime next year. ...