NASA invites Russia to explore moon

Jun 21, 2005

MOSCOW, 21 June (AFP) - The US space agency NASA has invited its Russian counterpart Roskosmos to join in its moon exploration plans, the head of Roskosmos said Tuesday.

"We received an official invitation at Bourget to take part in the moon programme," Anatoly Perminov told journalists, referring to an aerospace show near Paris that closed Sunday.

"We are currently evaluating the proposal and this question will be studied in detail during our meeting in September or October with the new head of NASA, Michael Griffin," he was quoted as saying in comments confirmed by his spokesman Viacheslav Davidenko.

US President George W. Bush said last year that a new round of moon landings should begin in 2015 in preparation for exploration missions to other parts of the solar system, starting with Mars.

(c) 2005 AFP

Explore further: India tests long-range missile from mobile launcher

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Going a long way to do a quick data collection

Jan 30, 2015

Like many a scientist before me, I have spent this week trying to grow a crystal. I wasn't fussy, it didn't have to be a single crystal – a smush of something would have done – just as long as it had ...

Gully patterns document Martian climate cycles

Jan 28, 2015

Geologists from Brown University have found new evidence that glacier-like ice deposits advanced and retreated multiple times in the midlatitude regions of Mars in the relatively recent past.

Huge asteroid to whip past Earth on Monday

Jan 21, 2015

An asteroid up to 1,800 feet (550 meters) across is headed Earth's way. But don't worry: It will miss us by 745,000 miles, about three times the distance between Earth and the moon.

Recommended for you

Japan launches new spy satellite

7 hours ago

Japan on Sunday successfully launched a back-up spy satellite, its aerospace agency said, after cancelling an earlier lift-off due to bad weather.

NASA launches satellite to measure soil moisture

7 hours ago

NASA on Saturday launched a new Earth-observing satellite that aims to give scientists high-resolution maps showing how much moisture lies in soil in order to improve climate forecasts.

Planck: Gravitational waves remain elusive

Jan 30, 2015

Despite earlier reports of a possible detection, a joint analysis of data from ESA's Planck satellite and the ground-based BICEP2 and Keck Array experiments has found no conclusive evidence of primordial ...

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.