Shuttle Cargo Ready for Return To Flight

Jun 15, 2005
Shuttle Cargo Ready for Return To Flight

The cargo for the Space Shuttle Discovery's historic Return to Flight mission (STS-114) arrived yesterday at Launch Pad 39-B at NASA's Kennedy Space Center, Fla.
Discovery's payload includes the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module Raffaello, the Lightweight Multi-Purpose Experiment Support Structure Carrier (LMC), and the External Stowage Platform-2 (ESP-2).

NASA's Italian-built Raffaello will carry 12 large racks filled with food, clothing, spare parts and research equipment to the International Space Station. Included in the cargo is the Human Research Facility-2 that will expand the Station's capability to support human life sciences research.

The LMC will deliver a Control Moment Gyroscope to replace an inoperable one that failed in August 2002. Gyroscopes provide attitude control for the Station keeping it properly oriented without use of rocket fuel.

A Thermal Protection System repair sample box containing pieces of the Shuttle's heat-shielding tile is also installed on the LMC. The samples will enable crew members to test new on-orbit repair techniques.

The ESP-2 will carry replacement parts to the Station. The platform will be deployed, attached to the Station's airlock, and serve as a permanent spare parts facility.

Returning the Shuttle to flight and completing the Space Station are the first steps in the Vision for Space Exploration, a stepping stone strategy toward new exploration goals. Using the Station to study human endurance and adaptation in space, and to test new technologies and techniques, NASA will be prepared for longer journeys on to the moon, Mars and beyond.

Discovery's Return to Flight mission is targeted for July 13 with a launch planning window that extends through July 31.

Source: NASA

Explore further: Meteorites yield clues to Martian early atmosphere

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

NASA to conduct unprecedented twin experiment

Apr 11, 2014

Consider a pair of brothers, identical twins. One gets a job as an astronaut and rockets into space. The other gets a job as an astronaut, too, but on this occasion he decides to stay home. After a year ...

Recommended for you

Meteorites yield clues to Martian early atmosphere

1 hour ago

(Phys.org) —Geologists who analyzed 40 meteorites that fell to Earth from Mars unlocked secrets of the Martian atmosphere hidden in the chemical signatures of these ancient rocks. Their study, published ...

Let's put a sailboat on Titan

4 hours ago

The large moons orbiting the gas giants in our solar system have been getting increasing attention in recent years. Titan, Saturn's largest moon, is the only natural satellite known to house a thick atmosphere. ...

Image: Rosetta's Philae lander snaps a selfie

4 hours ago

Philae is awake… and taking pictures! This image, acquired last night with the lander's CIVA (Comet nucleus Infrared and Visible Analyzer) instrument, shows the left and right solar panels of ESA's well-traveled ...

User comments : 0

More news stories

Meteorites yield clues to Martian early atmosphere

(Phys.org) —Geologists who analyzed 40 meteorites that fell to Earth from Mars unlocked secrets of the Martian atmosphere hidden in the chemical signatures of these ancient rocks. Their study, published ...

Let's put a sailboat on Titan

The large moons orbiting the gas giants in our solar system have been getting increasing attention in recent years. Titan, Saturn's largest moon, is the only natural satellite known to house a thick atmosphere. ...

US judge overturns state's abortion law

A federal judge on Wednesday overturned a North Dakota law banning abortions when a fetal heartbeat can be detected, as early as six weeks into pregnancy and before many women know they're pregnant.