Wall-Sized Electronic Paper at EXPO 2005 Aichi, Japan

Mar 31, 2005
Wall-Sized Electronic Paper at EXPO 2005 Aichi, Japan

"Yomiuri Global Newspaper - Electronic Paper" Delivers Fresh News to Visitors in Morning and Evening Editions

Toppan Printing Co., Ltd. is exhibiting a large-scale wall-sized newspaper utilizing E Ink Electronic Paper technology at EXPO 2005, Aichi Japan which started March 25, 2005.
This wall-sized newspaper application of Electronic Paper technology is called "Yomiuri Global Newspaper – Electronic Paper" (issued by Yomiuri Shimbun in cooperation with Toppan Printing Co., Ltd.). The latest news will be displayed twice daily (in morning and evening editions) throughout the duration of the EXPO (March 25 - September 25, 2005).

This large wall-sized newspaper consists of 272 individual Electronic Paper “tiles,” each of which is a combination of an E Ink frontplane laminated onto a printed circuit board with pixel electrodes. The result is an Electronic Paper newspaper approximately 2.2 meters high and 2.6 meter wide, the world’s largest of its kind.

It uses a design layout similar to an actual newspaper, where the headlines and article text are displayed on monochrome Electronic Paper and color photos are displayed on an LCD (liquid crystal display) monitor.

Specifications of the Wall-Sized Electronic Paper Newspaper:

• Display size: 2176 mm (H) x 2600 mm (W)
272 Electronic Paper tiles of approx. 68 mm (H) x 260 mm (W)
1 LCD Monitor, approx. 560 mm (H) x 990 mm (W)

• Display Control Method: Electronic Paper: Segmented
LCD Monitor: TFT Active Matrix

• Pixel Size of Electronic Paper: 4 mm square

• Power Consumption: Electronic Paper: Approx. 10W (no more than 16W during data processing)
LCD Monitor: Approx. 250W

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