New microSD Memory Card - World's Smallest Memory Card

Mar 16, 2005

At CTIA WIRELESS 2005 held here today, the SD Card Association (SDA) announced plans to finalize specifications for a new, super-compact memory card this Spring. The microSD card, expected to be the world's smallest memory card and measuring just 11mm x 15mm x 1mm, will be completely compatible with SanDisk Corporation's TransFlash format. The microSD card offers the advantages of removability and SD compatibility for use with a host of SD- and miniSD-enabled products.

SanDisk TransFlash has been widely adopted by key handset manufacturers around the world. The microSD card is supported by the more than 800 members of the SD Association and can be used immediately in the millions of handsets that currently use TransFlash. SanDisk plans to transition its TransFlash line to the microSD standard in Q3 2005.

"The microSD card was designed specifically for the wireless communications market," said Ray Creech, president of SDA. "With mobile phones now offering built-in, high-resolution camera functions, content downloading capabilities, compatibility with PC data, and more sophisticated applications, there is a clear need for removable memory cards that support these capabilities. The microSD card meets all the wireless applications requirements for size, speed, performance, inter-operability and security."

"SanDisk has been a leading proponent of industry standards since its invention of the CompactFlash card and co-development of the SD card," said Yoram Cedar, an SDA board member and senior vice president of engineering and emerging markets at SanDisk. "History has proven that manufacturers and consumers alike prefer a single industry standard card format that is broadly supported and that unifies the removable storage requirements both of mobile handsets and consumer electronics. We welcome the impending adoption of microSD as the new industry standard for mobile devices."

The SD Memory Card is the number one semiconductor memory card in use around the world today. The card's high transfer speed enables smooth exchange of data between a wide array of SD-enabled devices such as digital cameras and camcorders, printers, laptop computers, digital audio products, personal digital assistants (PDAs), and many other products. In total, 3,649 models in 31 product categories by 268 brands supporting the SD standard have been shipped to date.

The SD Memory Card is the dominant memory format of choice for the wireless communications industry. The format is supported by SDA members Motorola, Nokia, Samsung, Sharp, Panasonic, Toshiba, NEC and other leading marketers of SD and miniSD™-enabled mobile phones around the world.

microSD features and benefits:

-- World's smallest memory card
-- Specifically designed for mobile phones
-- Provides additional memory and expansion and upgrade potential for mobile phones without adding cost to handset
-- Permits lower cost handset production by minimizing embedded memory
-- Fully compatible with hosts that use SD or miniSD™ Memory Cards
-- SD Adaptor available so users can insert into standard SD card slot
-- Supports CPRM, SD and smartSD security
-- Operators could preload content as added value

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