HP, Intel chips face recall; IBM says it's not shipping affected parts

Jun 29, 2004

Computer chipmakers Intel and Hewlett-Packard have announced recalls of flawed chipsets. The causes of the recalls were unrelated.

HP said it discovered a defect “during routine testing of notebook PCs.” “A design flaw in certain notebook memory modules used across the industry…could potentially cause users to experience serious problems with their notebooks. The memory modules in question are not manufactured by HP and were supplied by third parties,” the company said in a press release.

Separately, Intel announced the recall of some chipsets less than a week after the products launched. The problem stems from failing to remove completely a thin film applied to one of the chips during manufacturing. Intel says it caught the potential issue early, and IBM said that none of these Intel chips shipped in IBM PC systems.

A spokesperson said that IBM tests recently confirmed that its current products are not affected by either recall. “Customers can be confident that all IBM products and components are subjected to a thorough battery of performance tests and quality checkpoints that identify potential flaws in memory and other components during our design phase before shipment to any customers. Questionable parts are disqualified from shipping in an IBM product,” the company said in a statement.

The original press release can be found on www.ibm.com

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