Researchers Capture Images that Illuminate One of Cell's Mysteries

Jul 18, 2008 By Bill Hathaway

(PhysOrg.com) -- Within human cells, tiny membrane-bound compartments called vesicles shepherd biomolecules from place to place.

How these vesicles form, move and finally fuse to deliver cargo at a particular destination largely remains a mystery, now being investigated by Yale researchers Karin Reinisch and Susan Ferro-Novick.

The scientists, both of the Department of Cell Biology, have focused on understanding the molecular basis for the final steps of cargo delivery, a process believed to be important in specifying the correct delivery address for a particular vesicle.

In the June issue of the journal Cell, they describe how they used X-ray crystallography to visualize a key step in this process.

A decade ago, Ferro-Novick’s lab first discovered the large multi-protein complex known as TRAPPI that plays a role in tethering a vesicle to its target. In a technically demanding feat, the team captured an image of TRAPPI as it activates a regulatory protein within the cell. Activation of the protein, known as Rab GTPase Ypt1, is a crucial step leading to the fusion of the vesicle. The study provides a framework for understanding how the many proteins involved in vesicle docking cooperate.

Large protein assemblies are difficult to crystallize and to visualize at an adequate level of detail, but the team led by Yiying Cai, lead author of the study, was able to overcome those technical hurdles.

“We were able to get these results only because Yiying was relentless in preparing samples of sufficient quality,” Reinisch says.

Other team members currently in the Department of Cell Biology include Darina Lazarova, Shekar Menon and Anthony Sclafani. Key contributions were also made by Harvey Chin in the lab of Enrique De La Cruz in the Department of Molecular Biology and Biophysics.

Provided by Yale University

Explore further: More vets turn to prosthetics to help legless pets

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Ferns borrowed genes to flourish in low light

Apr 14, 2014

During the age of the dinosaurs, the arrival of flowering plants as competitors could have spelled doom for the ancient fern lineage. Instead, ferns diversified and flourished under the new canopy—using ...

Recommended for you

More vets turn to prosthetics to help legless pets

56 minutes ago

A 9-month-old boxer pup named Duncan barreled down a beach in Oregon, running full tilt on soft sand into YouTube history and showing more than 4 million viewers that he can revel in a good romp despite lacking ...

Chimpanzees prefer firm, stable beds

10 hours ago

Chimpanzees may select a certain type of wood, Ugandan Ironwood, over other options for its firm, stable, and resilient properties to make their bed, according to a study published April 16, 2014 in the open-access ...

For cells, internal stress leads to unique shapes

11 hours ago

From far away, the top of a leaf looks like one seamless surface; however, up close, that smooth exterior is actually made up of a patchwork of cells in a variety of shapes and sizes. Interested in how these ...

User comments : 0

More news stories

More vets turn to prosthetics to help legless pets

A 9-month-old boxer pup named Duncan barreled down a beach in Oregon, running full tilt on soft sand into YouTube history and showing more than 4 million viewers that he can revel in a good romp despite lacking ...

Revealing camouflaged bacteria

A research team at the Biozentrum of the University of Basel has discovered an protein family that plays a central role in the fight against the bacterial pathogen Salmonella within the cells. The so cal ...

New clinical trial launched for advance lung cancer

Cancer Research UK is partnering with pharmaceutical companies AstraZeneca and Pfizer to create a pioneering clinical trial for patients with advanced lung cancer – marking a new era of research into personalised medicines ...

'Chief Yahoo' David Filo returns to board

Yahoo announced the nomination of three new board members, including company co-founder David Filo, who earned the nickname and formal job title of "Chief Yahoo."