Cloned horse gives birth

May 01, 2008

Italian scientist Cesare Galli says the world's first cloned horse, Prometea, has given birth to a healthy foal.

Galli, a pioneer in animal cloning, said the foal was conceived using artificial insemination but is not a clone, ANSA reported Wednesday. He said he hoped the birth will allay concerns about the health and normality of Prometea, who was created by Galli in 2003 as the world's first cloned horse.

"Pegasus shows that cloned animals can grow normally and reproduce in a natural fashion," Galli told the Italian news service.

Galli said 10 cloned horses have been created in the past five years, including Prometea.

Copyright 2008 by United Press International

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