Swedish mathematician receives Abel Prize

Mar 23, 2006

The Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters will award the 2006 Abel Prize to mathematician Lennart Carleson of Sweden's Royal Institute of Technology.

The president of the Norwegian Academy, Ole Didrik Lærum, made the announcement Thursday in Oslo.

Carleson will be honored "for his profound and seminal contributions to harmonic analysis and the theory of smooth dynamical systems," said Erling Størmer, the chairman of the international Abel Committee.

Norway's King Harald will present the $920,000 Abel Prize to Carleson during a May 23 ceremony in Oslo.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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