Seattle zoo slammed for elephant breeding

Dec 06, 2007

The Woodland Park Zoo has become the target of strong criticism aimed at stopping the elephant breeding program at the Seattle facility.

Members of the animal rights group, In Defense of Animals, have demanded that zoo officials call off plans to artificially inseminate an elephant, whose recent offspring died from a herpes infection, the Seattle Post-Intelligencer said Wednesday.

"It is just common sense. You have a contaminated facility. There is a very, very good chance you will have another death," activist Catherine Doyle said Tuesday.

Zoo officials are planning on using sperm from a male elephant living in Canada to inseminate their elephant, despite the fact that two elephants there have died from elephant herpes virus.

The zoo's deputy director, Bruce Bohmke, defended that decision on Tuesday, saying the risk is minimal and the breeding program will go forward as planned.

"There is always a risk in everything," Bohmke told the newspaper. "If you have one death, that doesn't make it more likely that you will have another."

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

Explore further: Bees able to spot which flowers offer best rewards before landing

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Recommended for you

The 'memory' of starvation is in your genes

37 minutes ago

During the winter of 1944, the Nazis blocked food supplies to the western Netherlands, creating a period of widespread famine and devastation. The impact of starvation on expectant mothers produced one of the first known ...

Brother of Hibiscus is found alive and well on Maui

3 hours ago

Most people are familiar with Hibiscus flowers- they are an iconic symbol of tropical resorts worldwide where they are commonly planted in the landscape. Some, like Hawaii's State Flower- Hibiscus brackenridgei- are en ...

Why do snakes flick their tongues?

5 hours ago

Many people think a snake's forked tongue is creepy. Every so often, the snake waves it around rapidly, then retracts it. Theories explaining the forked tongues of snakes have been around for thousands of ...

User comments : 0