Japan unveils fastest supercomputer

Mar 01, 2006
IBM Blue Gene
IBM Blue Gene supercomputer

Japan's fastest supercomputer system, running 59 trillion calculations per second, began operations Wednesday.

The supercomputer, consisting of two systems -- Hitachi's multipurpose supercomputer with a peak performance of 2.15 terra flops and IBM Japan's Blue Gene Solution with a peak performance of 57.3 terra flops -- is capable of making about 59 trillion calculations per second, the Mainichi Shimbun reported Wednesday.

The supercomputer will be used at the High Energy Accelerator Research Organization in Ibaraki prefecture for studies on high-energy accelerator science such as elementary particle physics and nuclear physics.

The institute will ask the public to propose specific themes of research activities using the supercomputer system.

It will pay about $30 million to the two companies for a five-year lease.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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