Horse gut reveals new bacteria

Aug 27, 2007
Horse gut reveals new bacteria

Two new species of bacteria have been discovered in the gut of horses.

Streptococcus henryi and streptococcus caballi, were found by accident by UQ veterinary science PhD student Gabriel Milinovich while researching the hoof-deteriorating disease laminitis.

Mr Milinovich made the discoveries in 2004 in horses at St Lucia but has only recently classified and confirmed their existence.

He said he did not believe the bacteria, two of thousands found in a horse's gut, were related to laminitis or harmful.

The 27-year-old from Toowong, said he named streptococcus henryi in honour of Dr Dick Peter Henry, a UQ veterinary microbiologist who continued his research based at Pinjarra Hills up to his recent death at age 78.

Streptococcus caballi was named in honour of the riding horse which is most prone to developing laminitis.

Mr Milinovich's research will be published in the International Journal of Systematic and Evolutionary Microbiology.

He is supervised by Professor Chris Pollitt, Dr Darren Trott and Dr Paul Burrell.

Source: UQ

Explore further: Researchers study vital 'on/off switches' that control when bacteria turn deadly

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