Briefs: Telecom N.Z. chops rural broadband prices

Feb 08, 2006

Telecom New Zealand is cutting wireless broadband prices for rural customers in what is seen as a response to growing competition from satellite providers.

Telecom says the changes announced this week will cut average rural Internet bills as much as 45 percent.

The company offers its wireless service through its Xtra Internet service provider and delivered over BCL's Extend network.

Telecom said in a release that the price cuts were aimed at encouraging the use of broadband by rural residents as well as schools and farmers.

Analysts, however, said that rural Kiwis were already jumping on the broadband bandwagon, but were turning to satellite providers such as Shin and Natcom rather than paying Telecom's relatively expensive DSL prices. The National Business Review noted Wednesday that prices for Telecom's business DSL plans had not changed.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: Criterion Collection extends Hulu streaming deal

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

US eyes phase-out of old telephone network

Nov 29, 2013

America's plain old telephone network is rapidly being overtaken by new technology, putting US regulators in a quandary over how to manage the final stages of transformation.

Internet's fast lane getting crowded

May 30, 2013

When Google Inc. tapped Kansas City as its first test bed for super-fast Internet service, the market looked poised to slingshot into a high-tech stratosphere. Two years later, as a few Kansas City neighborhoods plug into ...

China vows faster, cheaper Internet

Apr 02, 2012

China has said it will aim to bring faster and cheaper Internet access to more people, following complaints that a near monopoly by state-backed firms had hurt service.

Broadband internet for everyone

Feb 16, 2012

In the developing world, 96 percent of all households have no internet access. Even in Germany, many regions are still without broadband connectivity. But in future, a revolutionary new technology for wireless ...

Recommended for you

Floating nuclear plants could ride out tsunamis

4 minutes ago

When an earthquake and tsunami struck the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant complex in 2011, neither the quake nor the inundation caused the ensuing contamination. Rather, it was the aftereffects—specifically, ...

Unlocking secrets of new solar material

4 minutes ago

(Phys.org) —A new solar material that has the same crystal structure as a mineral first found in the Ural Mountains in 1839 is shooting up the efficiency charts faster than almost anything researchers have ...

Ten ways 3D printing could change space exploration

44 minutes ago

This close-up shows a titanium ball manufactured by 3D printing. ESA is investigating the potential of this promising new technology to transform the way space missions are put together.

Students turn $250 wheelchair into geo-positioning robot

56 minutes ago

Talk about your Craigslist finds! A team of student employees at The University of Alabama in Huntsville's Systems Management and Production Center (SMAP) combined inspiration with innovation to make a $250 ...

User comments : 0

More news stories

How does false information spread online?

Last summer the World Economic Forum (WEF) invited its 1,500 council members to identify top trends facing the world, including what should be done about them. The WEF consists of 80 councils covering a wide range of issues including social media. Members come ...

Patent talk: Google sharpens contact lens vision

(Phys.org) —A report from Patent Bolt brings us one step closer to what Google may have in mind in developing smart contact lenses. According to the discussion Google is interested in the concept of contact ...

Melting during cooling period

(Phys.org) —A University of Maine research team says stratification of the North Atlantic Ocean contributed to summer warming and glacial melting in Scotland during the period recognized for abrupt cooling ...

Australia's dirty secret: who's breathing toxic air?

Australians living in poorer communities, with lower employment and education levels, as well as communities with a high proportion of Indigenous people, are significantly more likely to be exposed to high ...