New Honda Accord drives itself

Feb 01, 2006
Honda Accord

Japanese car manufacturer Honda has launched a new self-driven car. Dubbed Honda Accord ADAS, the vehicle can change gear and steer itself around bends. While the auto-pilot function will currently only operate on motorways and dual carriageways, officials at Honda believe that future ADAS models will tackle all roads.

Graham Avent, a spokeman for Honda, points out that ADAS is not a substitute for alert human drivers but does allow people to take a rest behind the steering wheel during long journeys. ADAS drivers cannot leave their seats, but need only touch the steering wheel every ten seconds to indicate that they are still alert.

ADAS may also help prevent road accidents as the system can help to correct the effect of some driver errors.

The car’s auto-pilot capability is based on two main components: Adaptive Cruise Control (ACC) and Lane Keep Assist System (LKAS). ACC is a radar sensor placed behind the Honda badge at the front of the car. It scans ahead to look out for other vehicles, responding to the result by reducing or increasing the car’s speed accordingly. LKAS, a camera placed next to the rear-view mirror, monitors the white lines along motorways and dual carriageways, using the received data to control the car’s steering.

Honda UK says the car will cost UKP 25,880 (US$46,500) and will be in showrooms in March. All Honda cars will be equipped with ADAS by 2016.

Although ADAS can facilitate an easier drive, Honda insists that the driver’s role remains paramount. Even when activated, the auto-pilot function will be overridden by the driver’s input, leaving the driver in full control of the car.

Copyright 2006 PhysOrg.com

Explore further: Robot scouts rooms people can't enter

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Recommended for you

Robot scouts rooms people can't enter

42 minutes ago

(Phys.org) —Firefighters, police officers and military personnel are often required to enter rooms with little information about what dangers might lie behind the door. A group of engineering students at ...

Finalists named in Bloomberg European city contest

3 hours ago

Amsterdam wants to create an online game to get unemployed young people engaged in finding jobs across Europe. Schaerbeek, Belgium, envisions using geothermal mapping to give households personalized rundowns of steps to save ...

Attacks on payment systems trail other cybercrimes

3 hours ago

Target's massive data breach last year caused consumers to panic and drew attention to Internet crime. Yet a new study finds that breaches on retailer payment systems are less common than other kinds of attacks.

Internet TV case: US justices skeptical, concerned

3 hours ago

Grappling with fast-changing technology, U.S. Supreme Court justices debated Tuesday whether they can protect the copyrights of TV broadcasters to the shows they send out without strangling innovations in ...

Brazil passes trailblazing Internet privacy law

3 hours ago

Brazil's Congress on Tuesday passed comprehensive legislation on Internet privacy in what some have likened to a web-user's bill of rights, after stunning revelations its own president was targeted by US ...

LinkedIn to anchor new San Francisco high-rise

3 hours ago

San Francisco Mayor Ed Lee says the professional networking site LinkedIn will expand its presence in the city by anchoring a high-rise office building under construction.

User comments : 0

More news stories

Robot scouts rooms people can't enter

(Phys.org) —Firefighters, police officers and military personnel are often required to enter rooms with little information about what dangers might lie behind the door. A group of engineering students at ...

Finalists named in Bloomberg European city contest

Amsterdam wants to create an online game to get unemployed young people engaged in finding jobs across Europe. Schaerbeek, Belgium, envisions using geothermal mapping to give households personalized rundowns of steps to save ...

Internet TV case: US justices skeptical, concerned

Grappling with fast-changing technology, U.S. Supreme Court justices debated Tuesday whether they can protect the copyrights of TV broadcasters to the shows they send out without strangling innovations in ...

Brazil passes trailblazing Internet privacy law

Brazil's Congress on Tuesday passed comprehensive legislation on Internet privacy in what some have likened to a web-user's bill of rights, after stunning revelations its own president was targeted by US ...

In the 'slime jungle' height matters

(Phys.org) —In communities of microbes, akin to 'slime jungles', cells evolve not just to grow faster than their rivals but also to push themselves to the surface of colonies where they gain the best access ...

New alfalfa variety resists ravenous local pest

(Phys.org) —Cornell plant breeders have released a new alfalfa variety with some resistance against the alfalfa snout beetle, which has ravaged alfalfa fields in nine northern New York counties and across ...