Scientists try to grow bones from blood

Jan 30, 2006

British scientists at the University of York have launched a research project that aims to develop ways of making bones from blood.

Researchers from the University's Department of Biology are heading the EU-backed project to create bone structures from cord blood stem cells for use in the repair of bone defects and fractures.

The three-year, $3-billion research project involves scientists in from Britain and across Europe, as well as academics from the University of York's Departments of Sociology and Philosophy who will carry out sociological and ethical evaluations of the work.

The project will seek to find a viable medical use for the 2 million units of cord blood banked in Europe, and currently used for transfusions and treating leukemia.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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