New Delhi eyes frogs to stop mosquitos

Jun 22, 2007

New Delhi officials are considering the import of thousands of mosquito-eating frogs to prevent an outbreak of dengue fever.

Severe water pollution has decimated the city's once thriving frog population that fed on mosquito larvae, curbing the spread of dengue, malaria and encephalitis, The Times of London said.

Pesticides, raw sewage and industrial effluents have killed most of the frogs and environmentalists say the government needs to clean up the lakes, ponds, rivers and canals before paying farmers in neighboring states to bring more frogs into the capital. A study by the National Institute of Malaria Research concluded New Delhi's mosquito population has grown 45 percent in the past year.

Doctors say this year's dengue outbreak could be even worse than last year, when more than 3,000 people were infected and at least 60 died, the newspaper said.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

Explore further: Molecular gate that could keep cancer cells locked up

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Molecular gate that could keep cancer cells locked up

7 hours ago

In a study published today in Genes & Development, Dr Christian Speck from the MRC Clinical Sciences Centre's DNA Replication group, in collaboration with Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), New York, ...

Taking great ideas from the lab to the fab

7 hours ago

A "valley of death" is well-known to entrepreneurs—the lull between government funding for research and industry support for prototypes and products. To confront this problem, in 2013 the National Science ...

SR Labs research to expose BadUSB next week in Vegas

8 hours ago

A Berlin-based security research and consulting company will reveal how USB devices can do damage that can conduct two-way malice, from computer to USB or from USB to computer, and can survive traditional ...

Recommended for you

Molecular gate that could keep cancer cells locked up

7 hours ago

In a study published today in Genes & Development, Dr Christian Speck from the MRC Clinical Sciences Centre's DNA Replication group, in collaboration with Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), New York, ...

The 'memory' of starvation is in your genes

10 hours ago

During the winter of 1944, the Nazis blocked food supplies to the western Netherlands, creating a period of widespread famine and devastation. The impact of starvation on expectant mothers produced one of the first known ...

User comments : 0