ISRO To Launch Indigenous Cryogenic Engine This Year

Jan 23, 2006

Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) has said it will launch its Geosynchronous Satellite Launch Vehicle (GSLV) with a home-grown cryogenic engine by this year-end, reports PTI.

"Work is in an advanced stage. May be soon we will have a hot test, and after that we will take a decision. Most probably, the launch will take place by the end of this year," ISRO Chairman G Madhavan Nair told reporters.

The GSLV can send satellites into orbits nearly 36,000 km above the earth and the indigenous cryogenic engine will boost payload capability from the present 2,000 kg to 2,500 kg.

The cryogenic engine for the indigenous upper stage of GSLV has been successfully qualified, Nair said adding the launch will replace the Russian cryogenic engines that India currently uses for launches.

With respect to GSLV Mk III, Nair said the project was on schedule and the launch would take place by 2008. GSLV-Mk III will be able to launch a four-tonne satellite into Geosynchronous Transfer Orbit (GOT).

It is a three-stage vehicle with a 110-tonne core liquid propellant stage, and a strap-on stage with two solid propellant motors, each with 200 tonnes of propellant. The upper stage will be cryogenic with a propellant loading of two tonnes.

Copyright 2006 by Space Daily, Distributed United Press International

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