Moose multiplying in Scandinavia

April 20, 2008

Biologists say there are now record numbers of moose in Scandinavia -- the greatest population since the Ice Age.

By the end of the 20th century, there were 30 times as many moose as there had been 100 years earlier, Aftenposten reports. The number of collisions between moose and trains, trucks and cars was also a record this winter.

More moose has also led to greater numbers of wolves, one of the few animals that preys on moose. Carrion-eaters such as foxes and ravens have also been multiplying.

But biologists fear moose could harm the ecosystem by eating endangered plants and young trees. No one is sure of the ultimate effect on the ecological web.

Copyright 2008 by United Press International

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not rated yet Apr 21, 2008
Call me when they can do long division.

...sorry. :p

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