British butterflies need summer boost

April 25, 2008

British conservationists said 2007 was the worst summer for butterflies in more than 25 years.

Butterflies do not fly in the rain, so it is impossible for them in wet weather to reach the nectar they need for food. The heavy rain also means they can't breed, the group Butterfly Conservation said Thursday.

The U.K. Butterfly Monitoring Scheme found that eight butterfly populations were at an all-time low -- the Common Blue, the Grayling, the Lulworth Skipper, the Small Skipper, the Small Tortoiseshell, the Speckled Wood, the Chalkhill Blue and the Wall.

Sir David Attenborough, president of Butterfly Conservation, is trying to raise money to increase butterfly conservation efforts.

"Butterflies face mounting threats. Some face possible extinction," he said in a statement. "Money from Butterfly Conservation's 'Stop Extinction Appeal' will restore countryside for butterflies and other wildlife."

Copyright 2008 by United Press International

Explore further: Canada caribou and monarch butterfly "endangered": experts

Related Stories

Canada caribou and monarch butterfly "endangered": experts

December 6, 2016

Canada's caribou population has reached "all-time low" levels, particularly in the eastern Arctic, where the animal was classified as endangered Monday along with the monarch butterfly, according to a committee of scientific ...

Ornamental plants for conserving bees, beneficial insects

October 13, 2016

Insects play a vital role in ecosystem health, helping to aerate soil, keeping the natural system in balance, and preventing detrimental pests from taking over essential natural resources. Additionally, insects provide critical ...

Extreme weather effects may explain recent butterfly decline

October 31, 2016

Increasingly frequent extreme weather events could threaten butterfly populations in the UK and could be the cause of recently reported butterfly population crashes, according to research from the University of East Anglia ...

Cold spells chill tropical species

October 18, 2016

Two cold spells, two years apart, in two subtropical regions of the world have given scientists clues to what happens when an extreme climate event strikes.

Recommended for you

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.