More than 217 U.S. birds species imperiled

Nov 28, 2007

The Audubon Society and the American Bird Conservancy have identified 217 U.S. bird species as being the nation's most imperiled.

The organizations said 178 species in the continental U.S. and 39 in Hawaii are listed on "WatchList 2007," called the newest and most scientifically sound list of the United States' most imperiled birds.

"We call this a 'WatchList,' but it is really a call to action because the alternative is to watch these species slip ever closer to oblivion," said Audubon Bird Conservation Director Greg Butcher. "Agreeing on which species are at the greatest risk is the first step in building the public policies, funding support, innovative conservation initiatives and public commitment needed to save them."

The new list identifies 59 continental and 39 Hawaiian "red list" species of greatest concern and 119 more in the "yellow" category of seriously declining or rare species.

"How quickly and effectively we act to protect and support the species on this list will determine their future; where we've taken aggressive action, we've seen improvement," said David Pashley, the American Bird Conservancy's director of conservation programs.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

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