Lifting China tiger trade ban proposed

April 29, 2007

A Chinese wildlife expert says legalizing the trade in tiger body parts is necessary to finance continued preservation programs.

Liu Dan told China's Xinhua news agency Saturday the Siberian tiger refuge in Heilongjiang will have about 1,000 tigers by 2010 and will require a significant increase in funding for care and feeding.

Liu proposes allowing the parting out of deceased tigers to dealers in traditional Asian medicines as a means of financing continued breeding and preservation. He pegged the cost of feeding a tiger at $13 per day and reminded that the big cats aren't interested in excuses when lunch fails to show up.

"Lifting the ban provides a good outlet for the dead tiger bodies and generates more revenues for the parks, which will lead to better protection of the animals," Liu reasoned.

Xinhua said that while conservationists are taken aback by Liu's proposal, he contends legally selling tiger components would both generate revenue and possibly cut down on poaching.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

Explore further: Surge in seizures of captive-bred tigers strengthens call for Asia to close all tiger farms

Related Stories

UNESCO urges halt to plan for Bangladesh coal plant in delta

October 20, 2016

The U.N. agency devoted to preserving world heritage has joined environmental groups urging Bangladesh to halt plans for a massive coal-fired power plant near ecologically sensitive mangrove forests on the coast. UNESCO says ...

Malaysia's unique freshwater mussels in danger

September 22, 2016

Researchers in Malaysia revealed that Peninsular Malaysia hosts at least three rare mussel species, one of which (Hyriopsis bialata) is not found anywhere else on the planet. Another species (Ensidens ingallsianus) may have ...

Preserving the precious Tigers Milk mushroom

December 9, 2013

A technique to preserve cells from the rare and popular Tigers Milk Mushroom for later use is published in the latest issue of The Journal of Tropical Agriculture Science. The mushroom, Lignosus rhinoceros, is widely used ...

Recommended for you

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.