Organic calf born in New Hampshire

December 15, 2006

A bouncing, 42-pound organic calf was born at the University of New Hampshire's organic research farm, university officials said.

The Jersey calf, born Dec. 12, is the first-born to mother May, a University of New Hampshire Jersey bred in Vermont. Farm officials said 46 cows are expected to give birth and begin producing organic milk within the next month.

"She's a beautiful, healthy calf, and May handled the birth like a pro," said Charles Schwab, professor of animal and nutritional science at University of New Hampshire.

The calf will be named by the highest bidder at an online auction on eBay, with proceeds funding the university's organic dairy project. Mom and daughter are reportedly resting comfortably at the farm in Lee, N.H., site of the first organic research dairy farm for a land-grand university in the United States.

University of New Hampshire farm officials said they expect to begin shipping organic milk in early January.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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