Conditions better for Ohio dogs, not cats

July 6, 2006

Conditions for dogs in Ohio's animal shelters have improved during the past decade, but they have deteriorated for cats.

The Ohio State University study's findings are believed reflective of the entire nation.

The state's animal shelters reported receiving 16 percent fewer dogs during 2004, while the number of cats taken in increased by nearly 20 percent. And, while the number of euthanized dogs decreased by 39 percent, the number of cats put to sleep was up by nearly 14 percent.

Linda Lord, the study's lead author and a research fellow in veterinary preventive medicine science at Ohio State University, and colleagues collected 2004 data from 165 animal care and control agencies across Ohio. They compared the results with those of a similar study conducted in 1996.

The researchers queried local dog wardens, humane societies and animal control agencies in each of Ohio's 88 counties. Among other things, the study revealed since 1996 the number of shelters that vaccinate and spay or neuter their animals has gone up from 56 percent to nearly 71 percent.

The results of the survey appear in the July issue of the Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: Survey of animal shelters says dogs fare better than cats

Related Stories

Older is better for hunting dogs

January 18, 2012

( -- Older dogs and male dogs are better hunting companions than younger dogs and female dogs says the author of a new study on the hunting ability and nutritional status of domestic dogs in lowland Nicaragua. ...

Recommended for you

Amazon deforestation leaps 16 percent in 2015

November 28, 2015

Illegal logging and clearing of Brazil's Amazon rainforest increased 16 percent in the last year, the government said, in a setback to the aim of stopping destruction of the world's greatest forest by 2030.

CERN collides heavy nuclei at new record high energy

November 25, 2015

The world's most powerful accelerator, the 27 km long Large Hadron Collider (LHC) operating at CERN in Geneva established collisions between lead nuclei, this morning, at the highest energies ever. The LHC has been colliding ...


Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.