In Brief: Sprint with kid-tracking system via mobile

April 13, 2006

Sprint launched a service to allow parents to use a phone to pinpoint the location of a child on a map, complete with address and surrounding landmarks.

The family locator is "a valuable tool that can help parents and guardians have a better sense of their children's whereabouts when they're apart," said Danny Bowman, vice president of product marketing.

The service is available for download on 17 handset models and can be used to locate 30 SPS-enabled models. Up to four phones can be registered for the service for $10 per month.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: Scholar finds social media reveals much about the human condition

Related Stories

Rethinking the computer game as a teaching tool

August 23, 2015

Christian Varona didn't rely on textbooks and slideshows to learn history. When it came to studying for daunting Advanced Placement tests, he didn't turn to a tutor, either.

A meal and a webcam form unlikely recipe for S. Korean fame

August 19, 2015

Every evening, 14-year-old Kim Sung-jin orders fried chicken, delivery pizza or Chinese food to eat in a small room in his family's home south of Seoul. He gorges on food as he chats before a live camera with hundreds, sometimes ...

Recommended for you

Male seahorse and human pregnancies remarkably alike

September 1, 2015

Their pregnancies are carried by the males but, when it comes to breeding, seahorses have more in common with humans than previously thought, new research from the University of Sydney reveals.

Parasitized bees are self-medicating in the wild, study finds

September 1, 2015

Bumblebees infected with a common intestinal parasite are drawn to flowers whose nectar and pollen have a medicinal effect, a Dartmouth-led study shows. The findings suggest that plant chemistry could help combat the decline ...

How wind sculpted Earth's largest dust deposit

September 1, 2015

China's Loess Plateau was formed by wind alternately depositing dust or removing dust over the last 2.6 million years, according to a new report from University of Arizona geoscientists.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.