Study reveals new alcoholic genes

April 18, 2006

U.S. government researchers say they have identified new genes that may contribute to excessive alcohol consumption.

Researchers supported by the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism say their study -- conducted with strains of animals that have either a high or low innate preference for alcohol -- provides clues about the molecular mechanisms that underlie the tendency to drink heavily.

"These findings provide a wealth of new insights into the molecular determinants of excessive drinking, which could lead to a better understanding of alcoholism," notes NIAAA Director Dr. Ting-Kai Li.

A full report of the findings appears in the April 18 issue of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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