Microsoft 'committed' to China IT sector

April 18, 2006
Bill Gates

Microsoft Chairman Bill Gates said Tuesday that the U.S. software giant remained committed to a role in the growth of China's booming IT industry.

During a visit to Microsoft headquarters by Chinese President Hu Jintao, Gates said Beijing's efforts to protect intellectual property provided a foundation for that growth and that Microsoft was anxious to take part in helping develop a strong IT infrastructure in China.

Despite U.S. concerns about patent protection in China, Microsoft has extensive operations in China with more than 3,000 partners that include distributors, retailers and service providers.

Microsoft said Hu and Gates would discuss a range of matters during Tuesday's visit, including software development in China and research cooperation with Chinese universities and tech companies.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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