Yahoo! launches VoIP service

March 22, 2006
Yahoo! corporate headquarters in Sunnyvale, California

Yahoo! introduced Wednesday its messenger with voice system that will allow users to make phone calls via their personal computers.

The Voice over Internet Protocol network can be used in more than 180 countries, and so long as the call originates from a computer, it can be connected to a land line or mobile phone.

Meanwhile, U.S. users can receive calls on their PCs from traditional and mobile phones for $3 per month with Yahoo!'s phone in feature.

"Yahoo!'s top priority is to provide a stellar communications service through a variety of easy, fun and inexpensive ways to stay connected with others around the world," Brad Garlinghouse, vice president of communications products, said in a news release. "We look forward to further incorporating voice features into Yahoo!'s global services, from communications to search, to help simplify and improve the Internet experience for our hundreds of millions of users around the world," he added.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: If Google Assistant or Siri aren't smart enough for you, you can build your own AI

Related Stories

Disaster communications—lessons from 9/11

September 12, 2016

"The hotel is being evacuated. Please return to your rooms and prepare to exit." That was the first communication one of us, Dr. Terndrup, recalls receiving at a medical research meeting in the Brooklyn Marriott hotel that ...

Recommended for you

Making energy-harvesting computers reliable

October 28, 2016

A revolutionary and emerging class of energy-harvesting computer systems require neither a battery nor a power outlet to operate, instead operating by harvesting energy from their environment. While radio waves, solar energy, ...

How Frankenstein saved humankind from probable extinction

October 28, 2016

Frankenstein as we know him, the grotesque monster that was created through a weird science experiment, is actually a nameless Creature created by scientist Victor Frankenstein in Mary Shelley's 1818 novel, "Frankenstein." ...

Self-sealing syringe prevents blood loss in hemophilic mice

October 28, 2016

(—For people whose blood does not clot appropriately, such as those with hemophilia, diabetes, or cancer, getting an injection or blood draw with a hypodermic needle is not a trivial matter. Because the needle ...


Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.