IPv6: Challenge to Internet freedom?

March 20, 2006

A China-backed Internet technical standard reportedly might allow the traceability of Internet users, especially those opposing government policies.

The standard, known as IPv6, solves technical problems faced by the Internet around the world, The International Herald Tribune reported Monday. But critics say IPv6 would allow governments, as well as other entities, to track what people do on the Internet.

"There is now anonymity for criminals on the Internet in China," said Hu Qiheng, chairman of the Internet Society of China, a public-private group founded five years ago to promote the Internet in China. "With the China Next Generation Internet project, we will give everyone a unique identity on the Internet."

Added Hu: "It may not be popular everywhere to say this, but I think it is important for the government to monitor and police the Internet. Bad things now happen on the Internet, and we want to stop that."

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: IPv6 adoption picture is in pink but not rosy

Related Stories

IPv6 adoption picture is in pink but not rosy

August 6, 2012

(Phys.org) -- On June 6th World IPv6 Launch Day reminded the world of an industry-wide effort to help accelerate the use of IPv6 and to get websites to enable IPv6 permanently. Reports are coming in from stats-gatherers that ...

Making sure the internet delivers

July 4, 2008

European researchers have developed affordable test suites that businesses can use to check whether their software will work with the next-generation internet.

Networking: Sales skyrocket overseas

January 23, 2006

Sales of networking equipment -- routers, switches and the like -- are soaring overseas at major, multinational companies, indicating signs of a global expansion in the technology economy, experts tell United Press International's ...

Search engine picked for China IPv6 router

January 4, 2006

A Silicon Valley firm has been selected to supply network search engines for the first core router of China's IPv6 next-generation Internet Protocol.

Intel Suggests New Architecture for Next-Generation Internet

September 13, 2004

Intel Corporation described the significant changes that need to be made to the Internet's architecture to make it safer, more useful, reliable and accessible. In a speech at the Intel Developer Forum, Intel Senior Vice ...

Recommended for you

Secrets of a heat-loving microbe unlocked

September 4, 2015

Scientists studying how a heat-loving microbe transfers its DNA from one generation to the next say it could further our understanding of an extraordinary superbug.

Plants also suffer from stress

September 4, 2015

High salt in soil dramatically stresses plant biology and reduces the growth and yield of crops. Now researchers have found specific proteins that allow plants to grow better under salt stress, and may help breed future generations ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.