Briefs: Famed Pompeii house to reopen

March 17, 2006

One of Pompeii's most famous houses -- Casa degli Amorini Dorati -- is reopening after more than 10 years of renovation.

The House of the Flying Cupids, reopening April 3, is said to be one of the best examples of the age of the Emperor Nero, the Italian news agency ANSA reported.

Built in the third century B.C., the house was restyled several times before the 79 A.D. eruption of Vesuvius that buried the entire city in volcanic ash.

The house will be open by online reservation only at

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: Can towns near Japan's Fukushima nuclear plant recover?

Related Stories

Can towns near Japan's Fukushima nuclear plant recover?

September 8, 2015

A few signs of life are returning to this rural town made desolate by the Fukushima nuclear disaster four-and-a-half years ago: Carpenters bang on houses, an occasional delivery truck drives by and a noodle shop has opened ...

Singapore schools, F1 race on edge as bad haze persists

September 14, 2015

Billowing smoke from Indonesian forest fires has worsened Singapore's air pollution, raising concern among organizers of this weekend's widely anticipated Formula One night race, as well as in schools that reopened Monday ...

Spain prehistoric cave art gems reopen to lucky few

February 28, 2014

With its 14,000-year-old red bison, Spain's Altamira cave paintings reopened to a handful of visitors Thursday, giving them a glimpse of some of the world's most spectacular prehistoric art.

River in Colorado reopens as toxic plume reaches Lake Powell

August 14, 2015

A river in Colorado that was turned sickly yellow by a mine waste spill reopened Friday after the now-diluted toxic plume passed through and reached Lake Powell—a huge reservoir 300 miles downstream that feeds the Colorado ...

Recommended for you

Don't forget plankton in climate change models, says study

November 26, 2015

A new study from the University of Exeter, published in the journal Ecology Letters, found that phytoplankton - microscopic water-borne plants - can rapidly evolve tolerance to elevated water temperatures. Globally, phytoplankton ...


Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.