Briefs: Japan's Internet suicides continue to rise

February 9, 2006

At least 91 people committed suicide last year with others they met on Internet sites, Japanese police said Thursday.

The national police force reported that marked an increase of 34 deaths from 2004.

Of those who died, 54 were men and 37 were women, with 38 people in their 20s and 33 in their 30s.

So-called suicide Web sites have been of national concern in recent years, as many of those who are looking to end their own lives seek out others in similar situations so they can group together and have the courage to commit suicide.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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