Study: Connection between music, reading

November 17, 2005

Researchers at Stanford University say they have made a connection between a person's musical training and their ability to process words.

The study shows training in music can lead to the brain's ability to quickly differentiate between sounds, similar to an ability to identify sounds in language, the San Francisco Chronicle reports.

The study was presented Wednesday at the annual meeting of the Society for Neuroscience.

Researchers say the study shows a person's brain can adapt and grow if it's trained to.

They say this could be used in children to stop poor reading habits or problems like dyslexia.

Critics say more research is needed first before getting parents' hopes up.

Copyright 2005 by United Press International

Explore further: How the finch changes its tune

Related Stories

How the finch changes its tune

August 3, 2015

Like top musicians, songbirds train from a young age to weed out errors and trim variability from their songs, ultimately becoming consistent and reliable performers. But as with human musicians, even the best are not machines. ...

Innovations from the wild world of optics and photonics

August 2, 2015

Traditional computers manipulate electrons to turn our keystrokes and Google searches into meaningful actions. But as components of the computer processor shrink to only a few atoms across, those same electrons become unpredictable ...

Songbirds have a thing for patterns

June 25, 2015

You might think that young children would first learn to recognize sounds and then learn how those categories of sounds fit together into words. But that isn't how it works. Rather, kids learn sounds and words at the same ...

Recommended for you

Chemists solve major piece of cellular mystery

August 27, 2015

Not just anything is allowed to enter the nucleus, the heart of eukaryotic cells where, among other things, genetic information is stored. A double membrane, called the nuclear envelope, serves as a wall, protecting the contents ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.