Study: Morals often sacrificed for country

November 18, 2005

A Virginia Tech study suggests statesmen often abandon their principles for the good of their country.

A researcher at the school's Institute for Public Administration and Policy, Stephanie Newbold, looked at such moral dilemmas and explains elected officials often enter public office with an ideology or perspective for how the government should be managed and what it is and is not responsible for.

She said governing a nation is quite different from the way individuals govern themselves or what they believe the government should be. For example, Newbold notes that with the Louisiana Purchase, Thomas Jefferson turned on his own values, but made the best decision for the economic, political, and national security interests of the American people.

"His choice was the wrong decision for his peace of mind, his moral consistency, and the principle of strict construction, but it was the right decision for the nation," Newbold writes.

Her study is detailed in the November issue of Public Administration Review.

Copyright 2005 by United Press International

Related Stories

Recommended for you

Stressed out plants send animal-like signals

July 29, 2015

University of Adelaide research has shown for the first time that, despite not having a nervous system, plants use signals normally associated with animals when they encounter stress.

Wireless charging tech for metal case devices announced

July 29, 2015

Power up without plugging in—that has been the catchy slogan of Qualcomm's WiPower and now WiPower has reached a milestone: power up without plugging in even if the mobile device has a metal case. Qualcomm took center-stage ...

Japanese team fires world's most powerful laser

July 29, 2015

(Phys.org)—A team of researchers and engineers at Japan's Osaka University is reporting that they have successfully fired what they are claiming is the world's most powerful laser. In their paper published in the journal ...

New names and insights at Ceres

July 29, 2015

Colorful new maps of Ceres, based on data from NASA's Dawn spacecraft, showcase a diverse topography, with height differences between crater bottoms and mountain peaks as great as 9 miles (15 kilometers).

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.