Epson Introduces Multilingual Text to Speech Synthesis Chip

November 7, 2005

Epson today announced availability of its multilingual text-to-speech (TTS) synthesis chip for embedded applications. The S1V30100 is a highly integrated companion chip that provides a complete decode path from text input to analog output via headphones or audio line level output signals. The chip can be easily integrated with a wide range of host devices and microcontrollers using a message protocol that runs over either a UART or an SPI link.

The S1V30100 contains Fonix DECtalk v5.0 as its TTS engine, and the chip supports five languages: US English, French, German, Castilian Spanish, and Latin American Spanish. Further languages, such as Japanese, Chinese, and Korean, are currently under development. The chip also supports G.726 ADPCM encoding and decoding for pre-recorded speech at sampling rates of 24, 32, or 40 kbits/s, and has the option to support MP3 and/or AAC decoding of music data if required.

Target applications for the S1V30100 include speech-enabled portable devices, assistive devices for speech or visually impaired users, educational toys, automotive navigation systems, etc. The on-chip A/D and D/A converters can also be accessed directly by the host processor via an I2S interface, thereby allowing general audio data to be input or output to/from the host processor system.

The key features of the S1V30100 are:

-- Multilingual, unconstrained, 5-language TTS (Fonix DECtalk(R)).
-- G.726 ADPCM recording and playback.
-- MP3 and AAC audio decoding.
-- On-chip mono A/D converter and stereo D/A converter (sampling frequencies up to 48 kHz, with 16-bit audio samples).
-- Headphone and line level analogue outputs.
-- UART or SPI Host Interface.
-- 1.8V core operation; 3.3V I/O.
-- 160-pin PFBGA package (10mm x 10mm).
-- Non-volatile storage area for user dictionaries and storage of frequently-used text/data files and/or recorded speech data.

A complete PC-based development/evaluation kit is available.

Source: Epson

Related Stories

Recommended for you

How much for that Nobel prize in the window?

October 3, 2015

No need to make peace in the Middle East, resolve one of science's great mysteries or pen a masterpiece: the easiest way to get yourself a Nobel prize may be to buy one.

Trade in invasive plants is blossoming

October 3, 2015

Every day, hundreds of different plant species—many of them listed as invasive—are traded online worldwide on auction platforms. This exacerbates the problem of uncontrollable biological invasions.

Drone market to hit $10 billion by 2024: experts

October 3, 2015

The market for military drones is expected to almost double by 2024 to beyond $10 billion (8.9 billion euros), according to a report published Friday by specialist defence publication IHS Jane's Intelligence Review.

En route to CEATEC: 17.3-inch 8K4K LCD module

October 3, 2015

In the old days, people were impressed if a screen image simply was not blurry. "Clear" was the supreme compliment. We know the rest. Technology advances have raised consumer expectations; a competitive vendor in electronics ...

Fusion reactors 'economically viable' say experts

October 2, 2015

Fusion reactors could become an economically viable means of generating electricity within a few decades, and policy makers should start planning to build them as a replacement for conventional nuclear power stations, according ...


Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.