Genetically modified rice could pose risks

June 14, 2005

BEIJING, June 14 (UPI) -- Greenpeace China has warned that experimental, genetically modified rice is being illegally sold in southern China, posing possible risks to consumers.Researchers from the environmental group collected samples of Hubei-produced rice at a wholesale market in the southern city of Guangzhou in April.Tests by a German company revealed the samples were genetically modified, China Daily reported Tuesday.

Greenpeace fears that the crop, as yet intended only to be grown in closely controlled scientific trials, has already spread across China.

The group's food and agriculture campaign manager, Sze Pang Cheung, said the rice seed most likely came from Huazhong Agricultural University in Wuhan, where experiments are being done with genetically modified rice.He warned it could pose risks as it has not yet been approved for consumption.

Copyright 2005 by United Press International. All rights reserved.

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