LG Electronics develops world's first 50-inch single scan PDP

May 2, 2005

LG Electronics has developed world’s first 50-inch XGA-type PDP modules with the application of single scan technology, and is set to begin its full production and sales in May.
LG Electronics successfully developed an XGA-type PDP module with the application of single scan technology last June, and world’s first 42-inch single scan plasma TV the following month.
The single scan technology applied to the XGA-type PDPs can reduce plasma TV costs by about 20%, versus the existing dual scan technology.

The single scan technology applied to the XGA-type PDPs has solved problems involving the scanning time following an increase in resolution and screen size, and the ensuring of reliability.

To secure scanning time, the core element of XGA single scan technology, LG Electronics utilized its own-developed materials, and new driver wave called XTR (extremely Time Reduced) - jointly developed with Pohang University of Science and Technology.

Meantime, LG Electronics developed world’s first MCM (Multi Chip Module), IPM (Intelligent Power Module) and other related technologies, allowing it to secure the XGA single scan technology a year ahead of its competitors.

With PDP production costs recently competing with those of LCD and projection products, the XGA single scan technology is an essential core technology. The PDP industry will see a furthering of the technology development.

Kwang-ho Yoon, Executive Vice President of the PDP Division at LG Electronics, said, "The single scan technology has been successfully commercialized only by LG Electronics among the five PDP module makers. The development of 50-inch PDP single scan technology following the 42-inch technology proves LG Electronics’ leadership in PDP technologies.”

The 50-inch XGA single scan model outperforms the existing models in performance as well. The model utilizes an innovative electric discharge cell structure and an innovative electric discharge gas that enhances its light-emitting efficiency by over 30% compared to existing models. The model delivers world’s best brightness (1,000 cd) and contrast ratio (10,000:1). It also utilizes the company’s own developed picture-quality improvement algorithm (GCC, Gravity Centered Code / Meta Code) to deliver a sharper resolution.

The model has improved its brightness in consumers’ real watching environment, not just in research laboratories, improving it by over 20% compared to other competitors.

LG Electronics has thus applied the single scan technology to all of its mainstream models such as 42-inch XGA and 50-inch XGA products, allowing it to respond to price competition with LCD models and other models in performance as well.

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