Journal of Geophysical Research

The Journal of Geophysical Research is a peer-reviewed scientific journal published by the American Geophysical Union 80 times per year. It contains original research on the physical, chemical, and biological processes that contribute to the understanding of the Earth, Sun, and solar system. It has seven sections: A (Space Physics), B (Solid Earth), C (Oceans), D (Atmospheres), E (Planets), F (Earth Surface), and G (Biogeosciences). All current and back issues are available online for subscribers. The journal was originally named Terrestrial Magnetism by the American Geophysical Union s president Louis Agricola Bauer in 1896. It was entitled Terrestrial Magnetism and Atmospheric Electricity from 1899–1948. In 1980, three specialized sections were established: A: Space Physics, B: Solid Earth, and C: Oceans. Subsequently, further sections have been added: D: Atmospheres in 1984, E: Planets in 1991, F: Earth Surface in 2003, and G: Biogeosciences in 2005. The scopes of the current seven sections, published as separate issues, are: Each of the sections has one or more editors who are appointed by and serve at the pleasure of the President of the American Geophysical Union for terms of

Publisher
American Geophysical Union
Country
United States
History
1896–present
Impact factor
3.303 (2010)
Some content from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA

Checking up on tropical sunlight

Science is not settled on a bet or a hunch. Measurements and data feed conclusions and provide clarity. Scientists at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory found that two ground-based stations on a tropical ...

Jun 11, 2014 5 / 5 (2) 0

Tagging tiny particles in turbulent clouds

(Phys.org) —Hitching tiny atmospheric particles to cloud formation enables climate models to represent the particles' effects on convective storm systems. Scientists at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory ...

May 30, 2014 not rated yet 0

Unclouding our view of future climate

If we had a second Earth, we could experiment with its atmosphere to see how increased levels of greenhouse gases would change it, without the risks that come with performing such an experiment. Since we ...

May 22, 2014 4.6 / 5 (10) 12