Journal of Experimental Biology

The Journal of Experimental Biology is a peer-reviewed scientific journal in the field of comparative physiology and integrative biology. It is published by The Company of Biologists from editorial offices in Cambridge, United Kingdom. The journal was established in Edinburgh in 1923, entitled The British Journal of Experimental Biology (Br. J. Exp. Biol.: ISSN 0366-0788). It was published by Oliver and Boyd and edited by F. A. E. Crew and an Editorial Board of nine members including Julian Huxley. However, the journal soon ran into financial trouble and was rescued in 1925 by G. P. Bidder, the founder of the The Company of Biologists. Following the appointment of Sir James Gray as the journal s first Editor-in-Chief in 1925, the journal was renamed The Journal of Experimental Biology in 1929 (ISSN 0022-0949). Since the journal s establishment in 1923, there have been seven Editors-in-Chief: Sir James Gray (1926–1955), J. A. Ramsay (1952–1974), Sir Vincent Wigglesworth (1955–1974), John Treherne (1974–1989), Charlie Ellington (1989–1994), and Bob Boutilier (1994–2003). As of 2004, Hans Hoppeler (Bern) is the journal s current Editor-in-Chief. The journal has published

Publisher
Company of Biologists The Company of Biologists
Country
United Kingdom
History
1923-present
Impact factor
3.040 (2010)
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The origins of polarized nervous systems

(Phys.org)—There is no mistaking the first action potential you ever fired. It was the one that blocked all the other sperm from stealing your egg. After that, your spikes only got more interesting. Waves ...

Mar 03, 2015 report
4.3 / 5 (15) 3

Researchers reveal how hearing evolved

Lungfish and salamanders can hear, despite not having an outer ear or tympanic middle ear. These early terrestrial vertebrates were probably also able to hear 300 million years ago, as shown in a new study ...

Feb 06, 2015
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Bats change strategy when food is scarce

Echolocating bats have historically been classified into two groups: 'loud' aerial hawkers who catch flying insects on the wing and 'whispering' gleaners that pick up prey from the ground. While some bat ...

Sep 04, 2014
4.8 / 5 (4) 0