European Physical Journal D

The European Physical Journal D: Atomic, Molecular, Optical and Plasma Physics is an academic journal recognized by the European Physical Society, presenting new and original research results. The main areas covered are: The range of topics covered in these areas is extensive, from Molecular Interaction and Reactivity to Spectroscopy and Thermodynamics of Clusters, from Atomic Optics to Bose-Einstein Condensation to Femtochemistry. The EPJ D arose from various predecessors: Il Nuovo Cimento (Section D), Journal de Physique, and Zeitschrift für Physik D. Prior to 1998, this journal was named Zeitschrift für Physik D: Atoms, Molecules and Clusters. Until 2003, Ingolf Hertel was the Editor-in-Chief of EPJ D. From May 2003 on EPJ D had two Editors-in-Chief: Tito Arecchi and Jean-Michel Raimond. In January 2004, Arecchi stepped down and Franco A. Gianturco took over his position. In 2009, the newly appointed (third) Editor-in-Chief, Kurt Becker, took on the responsibility for promoting the Plasma Physics coverage of the journal.

Publisher
Springer Science+Business Media , EDP Sciences , Società Italiana di Fisica
History
1998–present
Impact factor
1.420 (2009) ()
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Novel high-power microwave generator

High-power microwaves are frequently used in civil applications, such as radar and communication systems, heating and current drive of plasmas in fusion devices, and acceleration in high-energy linear colliders. They can ...

dateFeb 11, 2015 in General Physics
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The power of light-matter coupling

A theoretical study shows that strong ties between light and organic matter at the nanoscale open the door to modifying these coupled systems' optical, electronic or chemical properties.

dateFeb 05, 2015 in General Physics
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Bringing the chaos in light sources under control

Noise is an issue in optical telecommunications. And findings means of controlling noise is key to physicists investigating light-emitting diodes or lasers. Now, an Italo-Iraqi team has worked on a particular type of light ...

dateNov 18, 2015 in Nanophysics
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Electron scavenging to mimic radiation damage

High energy radiation affects biological tissues, leading to short-term reactions. These generate, as a secondary product, electrons with low energy, referred to as LEEs, which are ultimately involved in radiation damage. ...

dateJun 30, 2016 in Condensed Matter
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