Ecology Letters

Ecology Letters is a peer-reviewed scientific journal published by Wiley-Blackwell and the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique. Marcel Holyoak (University of California, Davis) took over as editor in chief from Michael Hochberg in 2008. It is published monthly in print and online. Ecology Letters is abstracted and indexed in Academic Search/Academic Search Premier, AGRICOLA, Aquatic Sciences and Fisheries Abstracts, Biological Abstracts, BIOSIS and BIOSIS Previews, CAB Abstracts, CAB Health/CABDirect, Cambridge Scientific Abstracts databases, Current Contents/Agriculture, Biology & Environmental Sciences, GEOBASE, GeoRef, Index Medicus/MEDLINE, InfoTrac, PubMed, Science Citation Index, Scopus, and The Zoological Record. According to the Journal Citation Reports, the journal has a 2010 impact factor of 15.253, ranking it 66th out of 7943 scientific and medical journals listed and the first out of 129 journals in the category "Ecology". Ecology Letters covers topics in

Publisher
Wiley-Blackwell
History
1998-present
Impact factor
15.253 (2010)
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Ecology research paper wins national award

Humans are known to alter the planet. One efficient way is by adding new species to ecosystems. People accidentally (and oftentimes deliberately) transport species from place to place in airplanes, boats ...

Aug 04, 2014
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Study provides insights into birds' migration routes

By tracking hybrids between songbird species, investigators have found that migration routes are under genetic control and could be preventing interbreeding. The research, which is published in Ecology Le ...

Jul 21, 2014
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Fecal transplants let packrats eat poison

Woodrats lost their ability to eat toxic creosote bushes after antibiotics killed their gut microbes. Woodrats that never ate the plants were able to do so after receiving fecal transplants with microbes ...

Jul 21, 2014
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Old ways help modern maize to defend itself

Many modern crops have high productivity, but have lost their ability to produce certain defence chemicals, making them vulnerable to attack by insects and pathogens. Swiss scientists are exploring ways to help protect 21st ...

Jul 03, 2014
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Leafing out and climate change

Global warming is generally expected to bring spring forward but, as a new LMU study shows, a concomitant influx of plant species from warmer southern latitudes could counteract this effect.

Jun 19, 2014
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