Astrophysical Journal

The Astrophysical Journal is a peer-reviewed scientific journal covering astronomy and astrophysics. It was founded in 1895 by the American astronomers George Ellery Hale and James Edward Keeler. It publishes three 500-page issues per month. Since 1953, The Astrophysical Journal Supplement Series has been published in conjunction with The Astrophysical Journal. It aims to supplement the material in the journal. It publishes six volumes per year, with two 280-page issues per volume. The journal and the supplement series were both published by the University of Chicago Press for the American Astronomical Society. In January 2009 publication was transferred to Institute of Physics Publishing, following the move of the society s Astronomical Journal in 2008. The reason for the changes were given by the Society as the increasing financial demands of the Press. The Astrophysical Journal Letters is another section of The Astrophysical Journal intended to publish rapid communications.

Publisher
Institute of Physics Publishing
Country
United States
History
1895–present
Impact factor
6.063 (Journal)
5.158 (Letters)
15.206 (Supplement) (2010)
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Astronomers find unexpected 'storm' at galaxy's core

Astronomers using the National Science Foundation's Very Large Array (VLA) found surprisingly energetic activity in what they otherwise considered a "boring" galaxy, and their discovery provides important insight on how supermassive ...

dateFeb 11, 2015 in Astronomy
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Exploded star blooms like a cosmic flower

Because the debris fields of exploded stars, known as supernova remnants, are very hot, energetic, and glow brightly in X-ray light, NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory has proven to be a valuable tool in studying them. The ...

dateFeb 12, 2015 in Astronomy
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GTC obtains the deepest image of a galaxy from Earth

Observing very distant objects in the universe is a challenge because the light which reaches us is extremely faint. Something similar occurs with objects which are not so distant but have very low surface brightness. Measuring ...

dateJun 09, 2016 in Astronomy
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