rss Last update Ice sheets may be more resilient than thought, 1 hour ago

Earth Sciences news

The Alaska fire season - before and after

The 2015 Alaska fire season has been particularly brutal this year.  The fire season reached another milestone on Aug. 7 by surpassing the 5-million- mark in the number of acres burned so far this season. According to the ...

date6 hours ago in Earth Sciences
shares11 comments 0

GPM sees Hurricane Jimena's eroding eyewall

Hurricane Jimena, a once powerful Category 4 storm with maximum sustained winds estimated at 140 mph by the National Hurricane Center, has continued to weaken well east of Hawaii. The Global Precipitation Measurement or GPM ...

date18 hours ago in Earth Sciences
shares12 comments 0

Ice sheets may be more resilient than thought

Sea level rise poses one of the biggest threats to human systems in a globally warming world, potentially causing trillions of dollars' worth of damages to flooded cities around the world. As surface temperatures rise, ice ...

date18 hours ago in Earth Sciences
shares49 comments 5

The Alaska fire season—before and after

The 2015 Alaska fire season has been particularly brutal this year. The fire season reached another milestone on Aug. 7 by surpassing the 5-million- mark in the number of acres burned so far this season.

dateSep 03, 2015 in Earth Sciences
shares15 comments 0

Ocean upwelling and increasing winds

As the southern westerly winds drive the Antarctic circumpolar current around Antarctica, deep waters are forced up to the surface south of the polar front. Changes in the intensity with which this relatively warm, nutrient ...

dateSep 03, 2015 in Earth Sciences
shares6 comments 0

The escalation of natural disasters

I'm in Atlantic Canada giving a series of talks about Hurricane Sandy and what it did to New York (based on my book, Storm Surge). I've been talking about what happened in New York, hearing from people here about what has ...

dateSep 02, 2015 in Earth Sciences
shares17 comments 0

How wind sculpted Earth's largest dust deposit

China's Loess Plateau was formed by wind alternately depositing dust or removing dust over the last 2.6 million years, according to a new report from University of Arizona geoscientists.

Explaining crocodiles in Wyoming

Fifty million years ago, the Cowboy State was crawling with crocodiles. Fossil records show that crocs lounged in the shade of palm trees from southwestern Wyoming to southern Canada during the Cretaceous and Eocene.  Exactly ...

Quantifying the impact of volcanic eruptions on climate

Large volcanic eruptions inject considerable amounts of sulphur in the stratosphere which, once converted into aerosols, block sun rays and tend to cool the surface of the Earth down for several years. An international team ...

What would a tsunami in the Mediterranean look like?

A team of European researchers have developed a model to simulate the impact of tsunamis generated by earthquakes and applied it to the Eastern Mediterranean. The results show how tsunami waves could hit and inundate coastal ...

Intensity of desert storms may affect ocean phytoplankton

Each spring, powerful dust storms in the deserts of Mongolia and northern China send thick clouds of particles into the atmosphere. Eastward winds sweep these particles as far as the Pacific, where dust ultimately settles ...

Earth's mineralogy unique in the cosmos
Debut of the global mix-master
New study sheds light on end of Snowball Earth period
The downs and ups of mountain building
Helium anomaly preceded Mount Ontake eruption
Extreme diving, crucial to Arctic research
Oceanographers solve mystery of beach explosion
Iron: A biological element?
Big data maps world's ocean floor

Find more news articles via sort by date page